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You are here: Home / Sales & Marketing / How Does Amazon Go Really Work?
Amazon Go Makes a Splash: How Does It Really Work?
Amazon Go Makes a Splash: How Does It Really Work?
By Matt Day Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
JANUARY
24
2018
Amazon Go, the retailer's cashierless convenience store in Seattle, opened to the public Monday morning. We talked to an Amazon executive about the opening and test drove the store. People were curious enough about the absence of checkout lines to brave long entry lines to get into the place during the lunchtime rush.

Here are some answers to major questions about the store, which is located in the corner of an Amazon office building at Seventh Avenue and Blanchard Street.

How does it work?

Before entering, customers have to download the Amazon Go app on a smartphone (available on the Apple iOS and Google Android app stores), open the app, and link it to an Amazon account and a credit or debit card. After that, the app will display a unique code that, when scanned at the store's subway-turnstile-like gate, grants entry.

When you exit the store, items you took off the shelf will be charged to the card automatically, and the app will display a receipt for the purchase. In trials of the service on Monday, receipts arrived anywhere from five to 15 minutes after leaving the store.

Amazon says little about how it tracks customer purchases, other than that it uses cameras and a variety of sensor inputs.

Will I be charged for picking up an item to look at it if I don't take it out?

Nope, as long as you put it back on the shelf, Amazon says its system will automatically take it off your bill.

What if something goes wrong?

If you're charged for something you didn't take, swipe the item on your digital receipt to request a refund.

Can I let other people in?

Yes. Swipe your smartphone for guests first, and then yourself. Anything they charge will be added to your bill.

Can I use food stamps at the store?

No, an Amazon customer service employee told Slate.

What about privacy?

Video surveillance is common in retail outlets from convenience stores to big-box megastores.

But few places would seem to track your movements as precisely as Amazon does as its computer vision algorithms monitor your movements through its store. Does Amazon hold onto data about where you go, what you browse, and your image?

The privacy policy in the Amazon Go app appears to be identical to Amazon's general privacy notice, which goes into detail about browsing Amazon.com but has no mention of Amazon Go-specific terms.

Is the place wheelchair friendly?

There is a ramp at an entrance, and two wide turnstiles on the left side as you enter the store. But, after entry, its unclear what accommodations the store makes for people who need help grabbing items or navigating the aisles.

© 2018 Seattle Times under contract with NewsEdge/Acquire Media. All rights reserved.

Image credit: Amazon; Google Play; Artist's concept.

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